Indiana

Indiana Criminal Justice Institute

Guided by a Board of Trustees representing all components of Indiana's criminal and juvenile justice systems, the Indiana Criminal Justice Institute (ICJI) serves as the state's planning agency for criminal justice, juvenile justice, traffic safety, and victim services. The Institute develops long-range strategies for the effective administration of Indiana's criminal and juvenile justice systems and administers federal and state funds to carry out these strategies.

Established by Public Law 46 in 1983, the Indiana Criminal Justice Institute (ICJI) serves as the state's planning agency for criminal justice, juvenile justice, traffic safety, and victims’ services. The ICJI develops long-range strategies for the effective administration of Indiana's criminal and juvenile justice systems and administers federal and state funds to carry out these strategies.

The ICJI brings together key leaders from the justice system on state, local, and national levels to identify critical issues facing the criminal justice system in Indiana. The agency works to evaluate policies, programs, and legislation designed to address these issues. The statutory responsibilities of the agency fall into four categories, which include: information systems and technology, research and analysis, policy and planning, and grants administration.

Below you will find more information on the Indiana Criminal Justice Institute.

Commissions, Boards, Committees, and Councils
Reports
Strategic Planning
Organization

Commissions, Boards, Committees, and Councils

Board of Trustees
The Indiana Criminal Justice Institute is governed by a Board of Trustees representing all components of Indiana’s criminal and juvenile justice systems. The board is led by a chair who is appointed by the governor. Trustees appointed by the governor serve an initial three-year term and may be reappointed for an additional term(s). The additional term(s) may be four years in length. The board is required to meet on a quarterly basis and at such times as called by the chairman. Pursuant to IC 5-2-6-5 board members are required to evaluate and disseminate to the public information concerning the cost and effectiveness of the criminal and juvenile justice systems; promote coordination and cooperation for the effective administration of the criminal and juvenile justice systems; establish plans for the criminal and juvenile justice systems and make recommendations concerning the implementation of these plans. The Board of Trustees is comprised of:

♦The governor, or his designee, who shall act as chair.
♦The attorney general, or his designee.
♦The superintendent of state police, or his designee.
♦The commissioner of the department of correction, or his designee.
♦The executive director of the prosecuting attorney’s council.
♦The executive director of the judicial center.
♦The executive director of the public defender’s council.
♦The state public defender.
♦Eight persons who are appointed by and who serve at the pleasure of the governor, including one sheriff, one chief of police, one judge of a court with both juvenile and general criminal jurisdiction and, five citizens who have manifested an interest in criminal or juvenile justice, one of whom shall be a member of the state advisory group under the Juvenile Justice Act.

Governor's Council on Impaired and Dangerous Driving
The Governor's Council on Impaired and Dangerous Driving serves as the traffic safety focal point in Indiana and provides ongoing support to state and local traffic safety advocates. The goal of the council is to facilitate the mission of the ICJI’s Traffic Safety division, which is to reduce death, injuries and economic costs associated with motor vehicle crashes. Additionally, the council works with the Traffic Safety division of the ICJI in an advisory capacity to ensure that funding received by this division from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is effectively targeted and administered. The council's advisory board consists of a diverse group of volunteers who are appointed by the governor to make traffic safety policy recommendations.

Governor's Commission for a Drug-Free Indiana
The Governor's Commission for a Drug-Free Indiana (DFI) was established in 1989 by an Act of the General Assembly in an effort to accelerate Indiana’s fight against substance abuse. The Commission works in a collaborative capacity with 92 local coordinating councils (LCCs) representing all of Indiana's (92) counties. Each year, LCCs are charged with implementing comprehensive community plans, which address substance abuse challenges through treatment, prevention and enforcement. The Commission lends leadership and expertise in the development of these comprehensive strategies to ensure that resources needed to treat substance abuse are effectively targeted.

At the state policy level, the Commission: (1) addresses administrative and legislative needs to effectively use all resources; and (2) advises the governor and the General Assembly on strategies and policies needed to improve Indiana’s response in the fight against alcohol and drug abuse through public forums and reports.

At the local level, the Commission: (1) works to strengthen local coordinating councils and assists them in developing comprehensive plans and funding strategies; (2) mobilizes communities to wage local and coordinated battles against alcohol, tobacco and other drug issues; and (3) coordinates the efforts of state agencies through the interagency council on drugs.

Meth Free Indiana (MFI) Coalition
The Meth Free Indiana (MFI) Coalition was formed in 2005 to combat the destruction of Indiana communities caused by methamphetamine. This comprehensive approach to ridding meth from Indiana communities relies on enforcement, child protection, prevention and treatment. The Coalition is comprised of more than 15 agencies - including state government - working in cooperation with retail establishments such as grocery stores, pharmacies, gas stations, and convenience stores to help stop the meth epidemic.

Local Coordinating Councils (LCCs)
Each county has its own Local Coordinating Council (LCC), which is the planning and coordinating body for addressing alcohol and other drug problems in a county. Membership of a LCC should include volunteers from a variety of institutions and organizations including education, treatment, social services, and local police. The LCCs are required to submit to the Commission a Comprehensive Community Plan (CCP), which consists of 1) an assessment of the local alcohol and other drug abuse problems in the county, including problem identification and supportive data; 2) a listing of proposed objectives to help alleviate the stated problems; and 3) an evaluation component designed to measure the success of the Plan's strategies. Once the Commission approves a Plan, a copy is sent to the County Commissioners for their use in allocating local funds.

Domestic Violence Prevention and Treatment (DVTP) Council
The 2009 legislation that transferred the above program/funding streams from FSSA to ICJI also included language at IC 5-2-6.6 which brought a new, reformatted and expanded Domestic Violence Prevention and Treatment Council under the auspices of ICJI. The DVPT Council consists of thirteen members appointed by the Governor’s office. The ICJI Domestic Violence Program Coordinator staffs the Council. The statutory duties of the Council are to:

♦Coordinate and monitor programs for the domestic violence and treatment fund;
♦Develop and implement a state plan to provide services for the prevention and treatment of domestic violence;
♦Review and recommend grants and contracts;
♦Develop and recommend a plan to coordinate funding of domestic violence and sexual assault programs, and;
♦Recommend to the ICJI rules to be adopted by the Victims Services division under IC 4-22-2 to carry out this chapter.

Sexual Assault Victim Advocate Standards and Certification Board (SAVAS&CB)
In May, 2008 the Victim Services division assumed responsibility for the Sexual Assault Victim Advocate Standards and Certification Board (SAVAS&CB) as well as the Sexual Assault Victim Assistance Fund from the Indiana Commission for Women. The Board is comprised of twelve members appointed by the Governor who represent related professions as designated in the State statute. The mission of the Board is to establish and promulgate voluntary sexual assault victim advocate professional certification standards, to grant certification to individuals who qualify for the designation of Indiana Certified Sexual Assault Victim Advocate (ICSAVA) and to administer the sexual assault victim assistance account.

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Reports

Indiana Criminal Justice Institute (ICJI) Reports

2009 Indiana Criminal Justice Institute Annual Report
2008 Indiana Criminal Justice Institute Annual Report
2007 Indiana Criminal Justice Institute Annual Report

Indiana Disproportionate Committee (IDC) Reports

2007 Indiana Disproportionate Committee Annual Report
2006 Indiana Disproportionate Committee Annual Report

Traffic Safety Reports

FY2010 Indiana Traffic Safety Annual Report
FY2009 Indiana Traffic Safety Annual Report
FY2008 Indiana Traffic Safety Annual Report
FY2007 Indiana Traffic Safety Annual Report
FY2006 Indiana Traffic Safety Annual Report

Governor’s Council on Impaired and Dangerous Driving Reports

2002 Turning the Curve Toward Safer Indiana Roads Annual Report
2001 Turning the Curve Toward Safer Indiana Roads Annual Report

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Strategic Planning

Governor’s Commission for a Drug Free Indiana

County Comprehensive Plans
2007 Governor’s Commission for a Drug Free Indiana Strategic Plan

Meth Free Indiana Coalition

Meth Free Indiana Action Plan

Traffic Safety Division

FY2011 Indiana Highway Safety Plan
FY2010 Indiana Highway Safety Plan

Victim Services Division

2011 Action Plan for Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Services
FY2010-2012 S*T*O*P Violence Against Women Formula Grant Program Implementation Plan

Youth Services Division

FY2007 Indiana Three Year Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Plan Update
FY2006-2008 Indiana's Three-Year Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention

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Organization

Communications Division
The Communications division works to facilitate the mission of each program area within the ICJI by providing agency stakeholders, sub-grantees, the media, and the general public with information and resources that are consistent, relevant, and timely. The Communications division is also responsible for ensuring that the overall public relations and communications strategy for the agency is carried out as effectively and efficiently as possible.

Drug and Crime Control Division
The Drug and Crime Control division is responsible for improving Indiana’s criminal justice system, and promoting coordination and cooperation in the areas of drug control and violent crime. The division manages the allocation of federal dollars granted to Indiana through the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Bureau of Justice Assistance, Bureau of Justice Statistics, and the National Institute of Justice. Additionally, the Indiana Meth Watch Program is a vital part of the division’s work in the fight against methamphetamine and works closely with law enforcement, the retail sector, and community organizations dedicated to the reduction of substance abuse in Indiana. Meth Watch ties together methamphetamine education, awareness and crime reporting in order to reduce the number of clandestine methamphetamine labs in Indiana.

Research and Planning Division
The Research and Planning division works to improve and enhance Indiana justice policy, planning, and programs through basic research and program evaluation. The division guides statewide justice policy and planning initiatives with research-based data and information; conducts justice research and evaluates justice programs; develops justice information systems and research databases; disseminates justice information to the public at large; and serves as Indiana’s Statistical Analysis Center.

Substance Abuse Services Division
The mission of the Substance Abuse Services division is to reduce the incidence and prevalence of substance abuse and addiction among children and adults in Indiana. The division supports the work of the Governor's Commission for a Drug-Free Indiana, the Meth Free Indiana Coalition, and 92 local coordinating councils (LCCs) to combat substance abuse. The division works to create a comprehensive, unified and integrated response to methamphetamine and other drugs.

Traffic Safety Division
The Traffic Safety division is responsible for implementing programming designed to reduce the number of people injured and killed each year on Indiana's roadways. The division administers state funds and federal dollars awarded to Indiana from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration, and the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration. In this role, the Traffic Safety division conducts grant management, organizes media campaigns, produces educational/informational materials and coordinates special enforcement efforts with state and local law enforcement agencies.

Victim Compensation Division
The Victim Compensation division administers the Violent Crime Victim Compensation Fund (the Fund) as established in 1978 by the Indiana General Assembly (IC 5- 2-6.1). The Fund receives a percentage of court fees, work release money, restitution, 75 percent of punitive damage awards, a federal Victims of Crime Act (VOCA), grant and state appropriations. The division maintains a close working relationship with law enforcement, prosecutors’ offices, victims’ advocates, sexual assault treatment centers, and medical providers.

Victim Services Division
As the state’s administering agency of Victims of Crime Act (VOCA) and Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) funds, the ICJI’s Victim Services division monitors the activities of all sub-grantees and conducts desk reviews and site visits to ensure that awards are used for authorized purposes in compliance with laws, regulations and the provisions of contracts and grant agreements. This level of oversight also ensures that set performance goals are achieved.

Youth Services Division
Through federal funding received from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP), in 2009 the Youth Services division worked to address the following major initiatives: Disproportionate Minority Contact (DMC), Mental Health, and Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative (JDAI).

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